Index...

Home Page
Fireplace Doctor
Fuel Costs
Installation
Join
Library
News
About
Air Supply
Building Rules
Carbon Monoxide
CE Marking
Dictionary
Efficiency
Electricity - CHP
Fascinating Facts
Fuel Properties
Heat Need
Heroes
Legislation
Manufacturers
Open Fires
Smoke
Solid Fuels
Standards
Statistics
Supporters
Tables, Data and Formulas
Test Laboratories
Thatched Roofs
The Carbon Cycle
The Chimney Effect
Wood Fuel
ELECTRICITY FROM STOVES - CHP (Combined Heat and Power)

There has long been interest in devising a solid fuel heater which can also produce electricity. Possible technologies being investigated include:


Convector Generator The natural rise of hot fluids in a flue or duct due to the Chimney Effect can be used to move a vane. This method was known as far back as the 15th Century 'Smoke Jack' device, when it was used to turn a cooking spit.

Stirling Engine This ingenious type of engine (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stirling_engine) can sit on top of a stove and generate movement from the heat alone. Demonstration versions are widely available commercially, or you might like to try building your own from old cans: http://astro.sfasu.edu/courses/egr112/StirlingEngine/stirling.html

Free-Piston Stirling Engine This device uses the Stirling principle, but avoids the energy lost in cranks and other mechanical parts, to simply move a piston up and down a tube. If, for instance, the piston carries a magnet, it can induce a current in an adjacent coil.

Resonance Engine (or thermo-acoustic engine, lag engine) These devices convert heat into a sound wave (often by using a Rijke tube), the vibrations from which can be used to generate movement in a small reciprocating engine, or even in a loudspeaker, the coil in which will then generate a current. (Wikipedia Page)

Thermopile If the joint between two dissimilar metals is heated, a tiny current is induced. An array of such 'thermocouples' into a 'thermopile' can produce a useful amount of electricity. The 'Peltier' devices used in electronics to provide a cooling effect will produce current when heated. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermopile)



ADVERTISEMENT
TO ADVERTISE HERE
| © Soliftec Ltd | SiteMap This page updated 02/09/2014


BUILT WITH WHIMBERRY.COM
matrixstats